Buildings and Design

Feature: A measure of success needed for energy harvesting

Tiny devices that scavenge wasted energy could boost European industry and create a multibillion market but require urgent agreement on measurement standards. A new project has been set up to ensure European developers don’t miss out.

EnLight and Macy's plan bright futures for LED lighting

The seven German partners in the European EnLight consortium have announced that they will aim for a further 40% reduction in the energy consumption of LEDs during R&D projects over the next three years.

London's public buildings to get £100m green makeover

Hundreds of public buildings in the capital could get an energy efficiency overhaul thanks to a newly established £100 million fund, the Mayor of London Boris Johnson announced this week.

Nissan LEAF to power homes

In a further announcement from Nissan last week, the Japanese company unveiled a system which will allow its all-electric LEAF car to act as a household power supply.

Additional Articles

Philips' bright idea wins $10m prize

Philips' bright idea wins $10m prize

A light-emitting diode bulb developed by Dutch electronics company Philips has won a Bright Tomorrow Lighting Prize (L Prize) from the US Department of Energy (DOE).

(East Cowes Energy Centre)

UK retailer John Lewis pledges to cut carbon emissions 15% by 2020

UK retailer John Lewis pledges to cut carbon emissions 15% by 2020

UK retailer the John Lewis Partnership yesterday announced plans to reduce its carbon emissions 15% by 2020/2021.

Deborah Mills

The future of planning in the UK

The future of planning in the UK

UK energy legislation has changed greatly over the last few years to reflect the country’s necessity to meet projected energy demands as well as carbon emission reduction targets. With the UK Energy Act 2008, the Climate Change Act 2008 and the Planning Act 2008 all now published, these important legislative changes indicate the country’s commitment to the UK’s 2006 Climate Change Programme, which sets a framework for domestic policy initiatives in the final years of the Kyoto agreement to 2012.

United House refurbished flat in Islington, London.

Low-carbon refurbishment of homes – a sustainable solution

Low-carbon refurbishment of homes – a sustainable solution

With some 26 million homes in the UK, including seven million social housing properties, the widespread introduction of low-carbon refurbishment techniques could see millions of tonnes wiped off the country’s carbon footprint each year and hundreds of pounds off the average home’s fuel bill.

Low-carbon refurbishment goes mainstream

Low-carbon refurbishment goes mainstream

Nearly 30% of the UK’s CO2 emissions come from the country’s 26 million homes – with their demands for heating, lighting, hot water and electricity-hungry appliances. To reach the UK’s target of reducing carbon emissions by 60% by 2050 – or even 80%, as the target may have to be raised to – a significant reduction in emissions will have to come from housing. But how can we tackle the problem?